Fava Santorinis
13.Jun.2015

Lathyrus clymenum, is a flowering plant in the Fabaceae family, native to the Mediterranean. The seeds are used to prepare a Greek dish called fava Santorini’s. The plant is cultivated mostly on the island of Santorini in Greece and was recently added to the European Union's products with a Protected Designation of Origin.

fava fresh

For 3,500 years residents of Santorini and neighboring islands have been cultivating the legume species Lathyrus fava tossclymenum, known elsewhere only as a wild plant. The peculiar ecosystem that was created by the volcanic explosions on Santorini island, the volcanic ash, the cellular soil, and the combination of humidity created by the sea and the drought, make the bean a unique resource. When weather conditions are good, farmers on the island can reap about 800 kilos of beans per hectares. A vulnerable crop, it can be destroyed by strong winds that blow away its flowers before they can yield the pea, by drought or by a sudden heat wave almost instantly. Its production is thus limited making it an expensive crop that costs €700 per acre. The cost to the consumers is about €9-10 per kilo.

The fava is put into cold water for about two hours. Then mix with chopped onion into a pot with enough water and bring to boil, the fava is then simmered until it becomes porridge. Then using a mixer, it is made into smooth mush. It is salted and boiled a little again and typically served with chopped onion, olive oil and lemon juice. (recipe)

fava peas 

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